Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet PC Download on Windows 10/8.1/7 Online

Top 10 Best Cryptocurrency Wallets for 2019 (Re-Post)

Top 10 Best Cryptocurrency Wallets for 2019 (Re-Post)
https://preview.redd.it/g0j3lqvymxi31.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=f1024902cc5c9ad6f0417a419d0c1b4e75c2c13f
You've asked for a list to find the Best Cryptocurrency Wallet, We've delivered! Bitcoin prices have been rising throughout 2019, and have now hit over $10,000! Pair that with newer cryptocurrencies such as ether along with an increasing acceptance of blockchain tech plus media and government coverage, cryptocurrency wallets are needed now more than ever. Whether you are looking for the best cryptocurrency wallets, Bitcoin wallet or the best Ethereum wallet, we've got you covered.
These best cryptocurrency wallets, best Bitcoin wallets, and best Ethereum wallets have proven to be crowd-pleasers, and each comes with its own array of pros and cons that are mostly dependent on user preference:

1. Ledger Nano S (Best Ethereum Wallet)

The Ledger Nano S is a cryptocurrency multi-asset hardware wallet that looks like a folding flash drive. It can store Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other Altcoins. The Ledger Nano S connects via a USB cable and requires interaction with the device to confirm transactions. Ledger’s Nano S is also U2F authentication compliant for use with other services and can run multiple apps. The Ledger Nano is safe, relatively inexpensive, malware proof and cannot be hacked. For those reasons, we think it is one of the best cryptocurrency wallets. See #6 for the Nano's beefed up brother, the Ledger Blue!
Ledger Nano S is available in saffron yellow, flamingo pink, jade green, lagoon blue, and black.
According to Ledger, these are in stock and shipping.
Cost: $59
Buy Direct Here > www.LedgerWallet.com

2. Coinbase (Best Bitcoin Wallet)

CB is an established and dedicated cryptocurrency exchange, a Bitcoin, and Ethereum wallet, and is supported in more than 30 countries. They have helped over 10 million users transact more than $20 billion in cryptocurrency exchanges and is the industry leader for cryptocurrency exchange. They have a great user interface that is easy to use.
Free to sign up but they do charge a minimal transaction fee depending on the size of the transaction. Simply sign up, connect your bank account or credit card, then buy your cryptocurrency. You will need to verify your identity by providing 1 or multiple pieces of identity, depending on how much you buy. Once you've purchased your Bitcoin, You can easily transfer it to your “vault” for better protection. It may take several days to receive the first Bitcoins you purchase. Be sure to turn on 2-factor authentication for additional protection to your account, you can download this on any cell phone using Google Authenticator or Authy.
Sign Up Here > www.Coinbase.com

3. Ledger BLUE

The “Rolls Royce of hardware wallets! It is by far the most advanced hardware security gear on the market. Comes with a color large touchscreen, Bluetooth, and a rechargeable battery. Lightweight for easy transportation and storage. Works with multi currencies and extensible with other apps. Ledger offers enterprise-level security. If it wasn't for the high price point, Ledger would get our vote for the top 5 best cryptocurrency wallets.
Shipping: Available for Preorder, According to Ledger this will ship in late September 2017.
Cost: 229.00€ or roughly $270 USD.
Buy Direct Here > www.LedgerWallet.com

4. KeepKey

KeepKey is a simple hardware wallet that secures Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Dogecoin dash, and Namecoin. Your assets are protected from hackers and thieves. They claim to be virus and malware proof because it does not have an operating system like your phone or computer. The firmware is 100% open source and works on PC, Mac, Linux, and Android. You can make modifications to their firmware or create your own, then run it. Keep Key has a great digital display and comes in a very appealing anodized aluminum and black polycarbonate case. They offer a 1-year limited warranty.
As of 8/29/2017, These are finally back in stock!
Cost: $99 USD.
Buy Direct Here > www.KeepKey.com

5. TREZOR

TREZOR is an industry-leading hardware multi-cryptocurrency wallet. They were the original hardware wallet and claim to be the most secure. These are quick to setup and easy to use. They offer a Google Chrome extension that communicates with your hardware. TREZOR combines an easy setup with a small, durable token for authenticating and storing cryptocurrency. The token can also act as a security key for the new U2F authentication process.
These are available in black and white colors.
Customers tell us these are shipping 4 days after the order is placed.
Cost: 89. € or roughly $10 USD. They also offer a “Multipack that contains 3 Trezors and gives you a 22€ discount.
Buy Direct Here > www.Trezor.io

6. StrongCoin

StrongCoin one of the best cryptocurrency wallets. They are a hybrid wallet allows you to send and receive Bitcoins just like any other wallet. However, the Bitcoin private key which is required to send money is encrypted in your browser before it reaches their servers. They can never hold your bitcoins ransom because you are able to download your entire account as a PDF. You can purchase bitcoins directly to your StrongCoin wallet so they are never at risk of theft on an exchange. StrongCoin is the longest running Bitcoin wallet. 110,000 users have signed up and it appears to be a very well known and widely used company. Their wallets are free to create but they do charge a small transaction fee depending on the amount of Bitcoin.
Sign Up Here > www.StrongCoin.com

7. Exodus

If this page were titled The Best Designed Cryptocurrency Wallet and not Best Cryptocurrency Wallets, Exodus would be the clear winner. Exodus is the first desktop software wallet to have ShapeShift built into the interface in order to allow for rapid conversion between various altcoins and cryptocurrencies. Beyond having ShapeShift integration, Exodus is a multi-asset wallet and lets you store your private keys in one application with a customizable user interface. You have full control over your encrypted private keys, they have beautiful live charts and you can customize the look and feel of their interface. They offer 24/7 support via their help desk or email which makes communication nice for late night projects. They also offer a Slack channel for communication with other users. Exodus is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This software is free to download.

8. Jaxx – Ice Cube

Jaxx established their brand by allowing for cross-platform support with their crypto wallet. They have added integration support for ShapeShift and gives users a multi-currency wallet that they hold the private keys for. Jaxx announced the “Ice Cube” which is a hardware wallet with a camera and cellular chip for broadcasting transactions that never connects to the internet. The Ice Cube is water and fire resistant. This company is small and can also be stored in a safe or safety deposit box for security. Jaxx has a beautiful user interface and visible code, you can tell they have designed this product for the amateur as well as the most experienced Crypto enthusiast.

9. Mycelium

Granted the prestigious “Best Mobile App” award by Blockchain.info in 2014, the wallet provides the ability to send and receive bitcoins whilst benefiting from bank-grade security. Mycelium is an Android-based multi-asset cryptocurrency wallet that has been tested by hundreds of thousands of users. At the time of writing this, they had the most stars on Google Play. They are in the midst of integrating with a variety of third-party service providers to bring new and emerging applications into a realm of usefulness that can only be achieved with native functionality and a high degree of user trust. They currently integrate with Cashila, Glidera, Coinapult, Trezor, and Ledger. Mycelium also has hardware wallets and is working to further the development of decentralized applications (DApps). They are constantly upgrading this software. They are working on a personal finance tool to pay your bills and manage your finances and investments. This is the best Ethereum wallet and the best Bitcoin Wallet.

10. Electrum

Electrum was created by Thomas Voegtlin in November 2011, as a result, various developers have contributed to its source code. A software wallet that was designed to give users the freedom to manage their funds and private keys in a secure manner. Electrum allows you to store your private keys offline and integrates with some hardware wallets like TREZOR or Ledger products. Electrum utilizes decentralized servers to ensure minimal to no downtime.

Different Types of Cryptocurrency Wallets:

What is a Cryptocurrency Hardware Wallet?

These cryptocurrency Wallets store your information offline so it cannot be hacked. While it is more expensive than most other wallets, It can be a great investment. A lot of people buy 2-4 hardware wallets to spread the risk of losing one. We recommend storing this in a safety deposit box at your bank or in a very safe and secure place in your home. The downside of these wallets is losing your wallet, be careful! For security, we think these are the best cryptocurrency wallets available.

What is a Cryptocurrency Web Wallet?

These are the easiest wallets to use and the most convenient. Most websites will allow for 2-factor authentication through Google, text message, or Authy. This adds a great layer of protection. We have heard of very few cases where these accounts were hacked individually but we have heard of entire exchanges getting hacked which results in stolen bitcoins. We always keep some of our Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum and other Altcoins in web-based crypto wallets so we can easily day trade and move funds around.

What is a Cryptocurrency Desktop Wallet?

These are great wallets for storing cryptocurrency. You don't have the concern of losing your wallet like a hardware cryptocurrency wallets. You don't have the concern of getting hacked like web-based cryptocurrency wallets. These desktop wallets are generally free or low cost. You are however at risk of losing your wallet if your computer fails or is lost or stolen. If you want to make sure you don't lose these wallets, we suggest printing them on a durable material like foam board printing. These can make for the best bitcoin wallet and also the best Etereum wallet.

What is a Cryptocurrency Mobile Wallet?

Both Apple and Android offer mobile app based cryptocurrency wallets. These are great because you can use them on the go and on the fly. We have read several reports on Reddit about fraudulent apps that steal your bitcoin wallet and all of its contents so please be sure to use a well known Mobile crypto wallet.

Link to original blog post: https://www.disruptordaily.com/top-10-best-cryptocurrency-wallets-for-2017/
submitted by Tokenberry to NewbieZone [link] [comments]

Mycelium new wallet announcement

We at Mycelium are officially announcing our new wallet, along with all the features that, until now, we have been keeping secret. The new wallet will also be simply called Mycelium, since it will no longer be just a typical wallet. Here are some of the features to look forward to:
We have been working on this new wallet in secret for over six months, and have decided to allow our most loyal users and supporters to share in our future growth. We are positioning ourselves to be the one wallet for all your needs, with the largest number of customer use due to widest third party support, and largest third party development due to the largest number of users. Our future revenue will come from licensing and revenue sharing from third party plugins, as well as from services we at Mycelium will develop ourselves (Gear, Swish, Card, etc.). Effectively, we plan to be like a Google Play or Apple Appstore of all things related to crypto finance. To let our users participate in the growth and help us along with development, we will be having a crowdsale, selling a 5% non-dilutable stake in Mycelium (SAR) directly on the blockchain. To find out more, please check out https://wallet.mycelium.com
submitted by Rassah to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is a Cryptocurrency Wallet?

What is a Cryptocurrency Wallet?
Use this straightforward guide to learn what a cryptocurrency wallet is, how they work and discover which ones are the best on the market.
A cryptocurrency wallet is a software program that stores private and public keys and interacts with various blockchain to enable users to send and receive digital currency and monitor their balance. If you want to use Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency, you will need to have a digital wallet.
How do they work?
Millions of people use cryptocurrency wallets, but there is considerable misunderstanding about how they work. Unlike traditional ‘pocket’ wallets, digital wallets don’t store currency. In fact, currencies don’t get stored in any single location or exist anywhere in any physical form. All that exists are records of transactions stored on the blockchain.
Cryptocurrency wallets are software programs that store your public and private keys and interface with various blockchain so users can monitor their balance, send money and conduct other operations. When a person sends you bitcoins or any other type of digital currency, they are essentially signing off ownership of the coins to your wallet’s address. To be able to spend those coins and unlock the funds, the private key stored in your wallet must match the public address the currency is assigned to. If public and private keys match, the balance in your digital wallet will increase, and the senders will decrease accordingly. There is no actual exchange of real coins. The transaction is signified merely by a transaction record on the blockchain and a change in balance in your cryptocurrency wallet.
What are the different types of Cryptocurrencywallets?
There are several types of wallets that provide different ways to store and access your digital currency. Wallets can be broken down into three distinct categories – software, hardware, and paper. Software wallets can be a desktop, mobile or online.
Are Cryptocurrency wallets secure?
Wallets are secure to varying degrees. The level of security depends on the type of wallet you use (desktop, mobile, online, paper, hardware) and the service provider. A web server is an intrinsically riskier environment to keep your currency compared to offline. Online wallets can expose users to possible vulnerabilities in the wallet platform which can be exploited by hackers to steal your funds. Offline wallets, on the other hand, cannot be hacked because they simply aren’t connected to an online network and don’t rely on a third party for security.
Although online wallets have proven the most vulnerable and prone to hacking attacks, diligent security precautions need to be implemented and followed when using any wallet. Remember that no matter which wallet you use, losing your private keys will lead you to lose your money. Similarly, if your wallet gets hacked, or you send money to a scammer, there is no way to reclaim lost currency or reverse the transaction. You must take precautions and be very careful!
Although Bitcoin is by far the most well-known and popular digital currency, hundreds of newcryptocurrencies (referred to as altcoins) have emerged, each with distinctive ecosystems and infrastructure. If you’re interested in using a variety of cryptocurrencies, the good news is, you don’t need set up a separate wallet for each currency. Instead of using a cryptocurrency wallet that supports a single currency, it may be more convenient to set up a multi-currency wallet which enables you to use several currencies from the same wallet.
Are there any transaction fees?
There is no straightforward answer here.
In general, transaction fees are a tiny fraction of traditional bank fees. Sometimes fees need to be paid for certain types of transactions to network miners as a processing fee, while some transactions don’t have any fee at all. It’s also possible to set your own fee. As a guide, the median transaction size of 226 bytes would result in a fee of 18,080 satoshis or $0.12. In some cases, if you choose to set a low fee, your transaction may get low priority, and you might have to wait hours or even days for the transaction to get confirmed. If you need your transaction completed and confirmed promptly, then you might need to increase the amount you’re willing to pay. Whatever wallet you end up using, transaction fees are not something you should worry about. You will either pay minuscule transaction fees, choose your own fees or pay no fees at all. A definite improvement from the past!
Are cryptocurrency wallets anonymous?
Kind of, but not really. Wallets are pseudonymous. While wallets aren’t tied to the actual identity of a user, all transactions are stored publicly and permanently on the blockchain. Your name or personal street address won’t be there, but data like your wallet address could be traced to your identity in a number of ways. While there are efforts underway to make anonymity and privacy easier to achieve, there are obvious downsides to full anonymity. Check out the DarkWallet project that is looking to beef up privacy and anonymity through stealth addresses and coin mixing.
Which Cryptocurrency wallet is the best?
There is an ever-growing list of options. Before picking a wallet, you should, however, consider how you intend to use it.
Bread Wallet
Bread Wallet is a simple mobile Bitcoin digital wallet that makes sending bitcoins as easy as sending an email. The wallet can be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play. Bread Wallet offers a standalone client, so there is no server to use when sending or receiving bitcoins. That means users can access their money and are in full control of their funds at all times. Overall, Bread Wallet’s clean interface, lightweight design and commitment to continually improve security, make the application safe, fast and a pleasure to use for both beginners and experienced users alike.
Mycelium
Advanced users searching for a Bitcoin mobile digital wallet, should look no further than mycelium. The Mycelium mobile wallet allows iPhone and Android users to send and receive bitcoins and keep complete control over bitcoins. No third party can freeze or lose your funds! With enterprise-level security superior to most other apps and features like cold storage and encrypted PDF backups, an integrated QR-code scanner, a local trading marketplace and secure chat amongst others, you can understand why Mycelium has long been regarded as one of the best wallets on the market.
Exodus
Exodus is a relatively new and unknown digital wallet that is currently only available on the desktop. It enables the storage and trading of Bitcoin, Ether, Litecoins, Dogecoins and Dash through an incredibly easy to use, intuitive and beautiful interface. Exodus also offers a very simple guide to backup your wallet. One of the great things about Exodus is that it has a built-in shapeshift exchange that allows users to trade altcoins for bitcoins and vice versa without leaving the wallet.
Copay
Created by Bitpay, Copay is one of the best digital wallets on the market. If you’re looking for convenience, Copay is easily accessed through a user-friendly interface on desktop, mobile or online. One of the best things about Copay is that it’s a multi-signature wallet so friends or business partners can share funds. Overall, Copay has something for everyone. It’s simple enough for entry-level users but has plenty of additional geeky features that will impress more experienced players as well.
Jaxx
Jaxx is a multi-currency Ether, Ether Classic, Dash, DAO, Litecoin, REP, Zcash, Rootstock, Bitcoin wallet and user interface. Jaxx has been designed to deliver a smooth Bitcoin and Ethereum experience. It is available on a variety of platforms and devices (Windows, Linux, Chrome, Firefox, OSX, Android mobile & tablet, iOS mobile & tablet) and connects with websites through Firefox and Chrome extensions. Jaxx allows in wallet conversion between Bitcoin, Ether and DAO tokens via Shapeshift and the import of Ethereum paper wallets. With an array of features and the continual integration of new currencies, Jaxx is an excellent choice for those who require a multi-currency wallet.
Armory
Armory is an open source Bitcoin desktop wallet perfect for experienced users that place emphasis on security. Some of Armory’s features include cold storage, multi-signature transactions, one-time printable backups, multiple wallets interface, GPU-resistant wallet encryption, key importing, key sweeping and more. Although Armory takes a little while to understand and use to it’s full potential, it’s a great option for more tech-savvy bitcoiners looking to keep their funds safe and secure.
Trezor is a hardware Bitcoin wallet that is ideal for storing large amounts of bitcoins. Trezor cannot be infected by malware and never exposes your private keys which make it as safe as holding traditional paper money. Trezor is open source and transparent, with all technical decisions benefiting from wider community consultation. It’s easy to use, has an intuitive interface and is Windows, OS X and Linux friendly. One of the few downsides of the Trezor wallet is that it must be with you to send bitcoins. This, therefore, makes Trezor best for inactive savers, investors or people who want to keep large amounts of Bitcoin highly secure.
Ledger Nano
The Ledger Wallet Nano is a new hierarchical deterministic multisig hardware wallet for bitcoin users that aims to eliminate a number of attack vectors through the use of a second security layer. This tech-heavy description does not mean much to the average consumer, though, which is why I am going to explain it in plain language, describing what makes the Ledger Wallet Nano tick. In terms of hardware, the Ledger Wallet Nano is a compact USB device based on a smart card. It is roughly the size of a small flash drive, measuring 39 x 13 x 4mm (1.53 x 0.51 x 0.16in) and weighing in at just 5.9g.
Pros:
Cons:
Green Address
Green Address is a user-friendly Bitcoin wallet that’s an excellent choice for beginners. Green Address is accessible via desktop, online or mobile with apps available for Chrome, iOS, and Android. Features include multi-signature addresses & two-factor authentications for enhanced security, paper wallet backup, and instant transaction confirmation. A downside is that Green Address is required to approve all payments, so you do not have full control over your spending
Blockchain (dot) info
Blockchain is one of the most popular Bitcoin wallets. Accessing this wallet can be done from any browser or smartphone. Blockchain.info provides two different additional layers. For the browser version, users can enable two-factor authentication, while mobile users can activate a pin code requirement every time the wallet application is opened. Although your wallet will be stored online and all transactions will need to go through the company’s servers, Blockchain.info does not have access to your private keys. Overall, this is a well-established company that is trusted throughout the Bitcoin community and makes for a solid wallet to keep your currency.
submitted by Tokenberry to NewbieZone [link] [comments]

Mycelium new wallet and crowdsale

We at Mycelium are officially announcing our new wallet, along with all the features that, until now, we have been keeping secret. The new wallet will also be simply called Mycelium, since it will no longer be just a typical wallet. Here are some of the features to look forward to:
We have been working on this new wallet in secret for over six months, and have decided to allow our most loyal users and supporters to share in our future growth. We are positioning ourselves to be the one wallet for all your needs, with the largest number of customer use due to widest third party support, and largest third party development due to the largest number of users. Our future revenue will come from licensing and revenue sharing from third party plugins, as well as from services we at Mycelium will develop ourselves (Gear, Swish, Card, etc.). Effectively, we plan to be like a Google Play or Apple Appstore of all things related to crypto finance. To let our users participate in the growth and help us along with development, we will be having a crowdsale, selling a 5% non-dilutable stake in Mycelium (SAR) directly on the blockchain. To find out more, please check out https://wallet.mycelium.com
submitted by Rassah to btc [link] [comments]

If you have used ChangeTip, please read how to withdraw your ChangeTip funds

ChangeTip recently announced that they are shutting down, and will have a window of a few months to withdraw funds. As ChangeTip is one of our primary donation methods, we wanted to reach out to make sure everyone can take out their money.
To check if you have money in your ChangeTip account, visit ChangeTip and login with your reddit account.
You can continue donating with bitcoin if you download a bitcoin wallet. More information below.

If you would like to keep your bitcoin:

There are various apps that store bitcoin securely on your phone or computer. We recommend the Mycelium wallet for iOS and Android or the Electrum wallet for Android, Mac, Linux, and PC.
Once you have downloaded a wallet, the wallet will provide you with an address where you can receive bitcoin. Copy this address.
Visit your ChangeTip account. You may have money in both USD and bitcoin. As bitcoin is the only currency you can withdraw, please click on the USD amount in the top right or visit here and transfer your remaining USD balance to bitcoin.
Click on your bitcoin balance in Changetip or visit here and find the Withdraw section. Paste in your bitcoin address from your wallet and click 'Select all funds'. Verify that you have entered the correct address, and click send.
The bitcoin should arrive in your account within 24 hours. If it does not, please contact [email protected]

If you would like to convert your bitcoin to cash:

There are various methods to sell bitcoin to USD. Coinbase allows you to sell bitcoin and withdraw it to a bank account. LocalBitcoins facilitates selling between verified buyers of bitcoin, which you can choose different payment methods for. Visit here for more ways to sell bitcoin.
Once you've decided on a platform, you will be presented with a bitcoin address to deposit. Copy this address.
Visit your ChangeTip account. You may have money in both USD and bitcoin. As bitcoin is the only currency you can withdraw, please click on the USD amount in the top right or visit here and transfer your remaining USD balance to bitcoin.
Click on your bitcoin balance in Changetip or visit here and find the Withdraw section. Paste in your bitcoin address from your exchange and click 'Select all funds'. Verify that you have entered the correct address, and click send.
The bitcoin should arrive in your account within 24 hours. If it does not, please contact [email protected]
submitted by Paltry_Digger to millionairemakers [link] [comments]

[ANN] Mycelium's new Local Trader feature will let anyone be an ATM

Announcement (posted to multiple sources)
This Wednesday, at the Inside Bitcoins conference in Berlin, the team behind the Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet and the much anticipated yet continuously delayed BitcoinCard, will demo a major new feature of their wallet, called Local Trader. This new feature is a person to person exchange, similar to LocalBitcoins.com, built directly into the bitcoin wallet software. As Jan Møller, one of Mycelium’s lead developers explains, “Mycelium Local Trader is a trading platform for the Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet which allows users to buy and sell Bitcoin. The initial idea comes from one of the biggest problems in Bitcoin: How to get your first bitcoins?”
The feature is still being finalized, but is fully functional on testnet, and is expected to be released later this month. At first, the trader options will be limited to “Continuous Seller,” where someone creates an offer to sell bitcoins and waits for buyers, and “Instant Buyer,” where someone who wants bitcoins right now can browse a list of sell offers in their area, and ping one to ask for a trade. When asked why the option to instantly sell bitcoins for cash was not available yet, Jan commented, “We wanted to attack what we believe is the most common problem: Getting your first BTC.”
Image 1
To set up a sale offer, the user first has to load their bitcoin wallet with some bitcoins. Since both the wallet and the trading platform are within the same app, the seller profile actually knows if they really have coins to sell. Once the seller presses the “Sell Bitcoin” button, Local Trader automatically registers one of the wallet’s bitcoin addresses on the exchange server as the key associated with the seller account. Like PGP, this bitcoin address and private key are used to authenticate with the trading server, where your user id, sell offers, trade history, and reputation are stored. Likewise, the private key is used to authenticate API requests to the server, a method that may mitigate the API key theft issues recently experienced by some exchanges, and in the future may be used to authenticate and possibly encrypt communications between users. For now, it just keeps all communications secure, and has the added benefit of being able to import your trade account, along with all its history, simply by importing the associated private key from a backup.
Image 2
In the Sell Order menu, users can create sale orders that include their location (obfuscated to a 1km square block), the exchange used for the price, seller fee, minimum and maximum amount they are willing to sell, and a custom message that buyers will be able to see when they select their offer. Sellers are not limited to the amount of sale offers they can create, and can make sell offers with different fees for different amount traded, different locations, and even set negative fees if they need to swap their bitcoins for cash quickly.
For anyone looking to buy bitcoins, they just have to press “Buy Bitcoin,” and they are instantly presented with a list of 20 closest offers in their area, sorted by distance using their phone’s GPS. Here, buyers can see offer details, such as nickname of the seller, their rating, price, distance, and minimum and maximum they are willing to trade. Clicking on an offer also expands it to show any custom notes the seller may have included. Initiating a buy offer is as simple as typing the amount you wish to buy into the text entry field on the seller’s offer, and selecting Buy.
Image 3
Once an offer is accepted, the seller’s wallet receives a notification, and the trading app switches to a window where the buyer and seller can see the amount and the price being offered, as well as a chat window they can use to negotiate the terms and location of the trade. The price can be changed and refreshed to the more recent exchange price as many times as the traders want before they agree on the trade, up to the point where they meet and swap cash. When each of them agrees on the terms, they hit Accept Offer, and the trade will only be considered accepted when both of them have agreed. However, the trade must go through within 24 hours of the buyer’s initial offer, otherwise it gets automatically aborted. Once the two traders meet, the buyer hands cash to the seller, the seller hits “Cash Received,” and bitcoins are automatically sent to the buyer's wallet, minus whatever fees were negotiated on.
Image 4
Another brand new feature that comes with Local Trader, which will likely be ported to other parts of the wallet, is the “Transaction Confidence” graph. Since Mycelium servers are connected to hundreds, if not thousands, of nodes, they are able to track transaction propagation through the network in real time. Transaction Confidence, expressed in percent, shows a close estimate of how much of the overall Bitcoin network has heard about the transaction. The idea is that, if most of the network has already heard about the transaction, double-spending it becomes much more difficult, and the chances of it being included in the next block approach 100%. So, if the confidence is high enough (it reaches high 90’s within a few seconds), you can be fairly sure that this transaction will be included in the block, and do in person trades with zero block confirmations. No more awkward waiting for 10 minutes (or sometimes as long as 50 as I had the unfortunate experience of at a local McDonald’s) just to make sure that both people are confident enough the transaction won’t fail.
Trader feedback is the only feature still undergoing the final stages of development, and will be automatically calculated based on the number and size of successful trades, response times, and trade aborts. For their part, Mycelium plans to charge about 0.5% per transaction for the service, but, like LocalBitcoin, will not object to people using the service to trade directly, bypassing the fee, since they believe enough people will find the convenience of trading directly through their system, along with maintaining a trade history and reputation, to be worth the small fee.
submitted by Rassah to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Sweeping BTC,BCH,BTG from old BIP38 paper wallets into Ledger Nano S

My notes on "sweeping" BTC, BCH, and BTG from very old BIP38 protected paper wallets into Ledger Nano S:
Details:
BTC in wallet stored since 2015, so it has the BCH (Bitcoin Cash) and BTG (Bitcoin Gold) forked coins.
BTC coins in paper wallets protected with BIP38.
Old-fashioned paper wallets: Single address (Not HD). Not SegWit. Not multisig.
Using a brand new Ledger Nano S. Bitcoin wallet in "Legacy mode. Bitcoin Cash wallet in "Split" mode. Bitcoin Gold wallet in "Legacy" mode. (I just wanted to avoid any complications from SegWit. It may have been perfectly safe to use it, but I did not want to risk it potentially complicating things.)
I wanted to move these coins to my Ledger Nano S.
  1. Moving the BTC:
Use the Mycelium (Android) "Cold Storage Spending" feature to move the BTC to Ledger. This part was painless. Wait 6 confirmations before going to next step.
  1. Moving the BCH:
Use the Coinomi (Android) app's "BitcoinCash" wallet to sweep my paper wallet's BCH.
After confirmation, I then wanted to send the Bitcoin Cash from Coinomi's wallet to the Ledger. This is where I encountered my first problem. When I would QR scan the receive address from the Ledger Chrome app, Coinomi would think I was trying to send to a BTC address instead of BCH and tried to do digital currency conversion which resulted in error messages about going over the maximum limit, etc.
I finally figured out it wasn't recognizing the Bitcoin Cash address being displayed in the Chrome app as a Bitcoin Cash address.
To work-around this, I had to use another Android app, QR scanner, to read the QR code from Ledger, copy the result to the clipboard (it was "bitcoin:1XXXXX"), modify the text to "bitcoincash:1XXXXX") and then paste the modified text into the Coinomi send-to address. Always double check every character of the address to prevent errors from typos (dropping characters, etc.) or clipboard interception malware.
  1. Moving the BTG:
The Bitcoin Gold sweep proved even more challenging. Switch to the "BitcoinGold" wallet in Coinomi.
Coinomi could not sweep the wallet using the QR scan of the BIP38 private key like it did for Bitcoin Cash, it just gives a "The private key type does not match the destination account type" error message.
Instead, from my laptop, I had to go to bitaddress.org, click on "Wallet Details", DISCONNECT YOUR MACHINE FROM THE INTERNET, and then paste the BIP38 private key into the "Enter Private Key" field. Click "View Details", and it will then ask you to type in your BIP38 secret passphrase. Do that and a bunch of private key WIF format QR codes will appear.
The Coinomi support page says to use sweep using the "Private WID Compressed key... starts with a 'K' or 'L' code", but this did not work for me (would only show me an "The address has no funds" error message). Instead, I had to sweep using the "Private Key WIF" starting with a '5' for it to work.
The BTG sweep instructions are generally from: https://coinomi.freshdesk.com/support/solutions/articles/29000017747-i-can-t-sweep-my-btg-private-key except that I modified step #6 (using the '5' WIF key, not the 'K'/'L' WIF key).
Once the sweep starts in the Coinomi app on Android, CLOSE THE bitaddress.org BROWSER WINDOW in your laptop's web browser, and then re-connect to the Internet.
After you get some confirmations, then you can send directly to the BTG address in the Ledger wallet.
Be safe:
For all the wallets you swept, don't ever use those private keys or BIP38 pass phrases again. After entering the keys and passphrases in multiple places for this task to split everything up, it's possible you may have accidentally leaked the keys somewhere, so just assume the keys are burnt from now on.
Hopefully this helps people. It took me all day trying different things until I finally found a combination of steps that worked. I guess there aren't many people with BTC from years ago still on BIP38 cold storage wallets.
submitted by bjguill to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

[Bounties] Bug hunters wanted

Testnet.BitcoinReserve.ch is looking for a few good bug hunters.
Offering $75 in BTC for fatal bugs and a sliding scale all the way down to $2 for minor typos. The first round of testing (see /BitcoinReserve) paid out over $350 to various testers.
Bitcoin Reserve allows deposit and withdrawal of Bitcoin, conversion to/from dollars and payments to other members in USD or BTC. The system is currently running on Testnet3.
I am the final and only arbiter of bounty payouts. The first person to find and report a particular bug will be paid a bounty. Subsequent reports on the same issue are helpful but will be paid a partial bounty only if they add worthwhile information. Be sure to include the URL and any supporting information with your bug reports: Bugs must be reproducible or otherwise independently observable (i.e. reviewing server logs). Larger bounties will be paid to the address you send me through a reddit personal message, smaller bounties will be paid through changetip. If bounty payouts end up exceeding 3 BTC, the contest will be paused as we examine what the hell is going on.
Again, the website is https://testnet.bitcoinreserve.ch, Happy Hunting!
Notes:
submitted by ReportingThisHere to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

New Nano S owner, not super happy

UPDATE
Some of the comments I've received suggested the unit was defective. I had ordered two at the same time, and was still reluctant to open the second in fear of lowering any potential refund or resale value. But I decided to risk it anyway as I'd like a hardware wallet to store LiteCoin.
I have to say, it was like an entirely different unit. It's much more solid and all the hardware issues I experienced in the other appear to be fixed. The connectivity is also much more solid and is meeting my expectations. I think it's an entirely separate lot than the other, as it had an older firmware version loaded on it.
So, I am keeping my fingers crossed the first was just a fluke and contacted support per the advice of btchip for a replacement device.
Thanks everyone!
I've been using the Trezor for a while now, but liked the idea the Ledger supports multiple altcoins and wanted to give it a try. My experience so far with the Nano S has been less than ideal, and I'm beginning to regret my purchase.
I haven't even begun to try and get this working on Mycelium or anything.
One of the things that disappoints me most is that these devices (Trezor and Ledger Nano S) both lack a USB-C option. I've been ridding myself of micro USB devices and these are really the last that I use often that still use the outdated standard.
Thanks for listening to my feedback/rant. If anyone has any advice to offer in adapting to the Ledger Nano S I'm all ears, but really I just wanted to vent my frustration. For the record the machine I am connecting it to right now is running Windows 10 using Chrome 58.0.3029.81 (Official Build) beta (32-bit). I've tried multiple cables, etc. I ensure the Browser Mode is off when connecting it to my machine to use with the Ledger Nano Wallet apps. Basically attempted every troubleshooting step I could find in the only knowledge base (which isn't that large right now).
submitted by CorpulentBrony to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

Sending Failed: Unable to validate transaction.

Not really sure what's going on here. Anecdotally, it seems as if I hosed my Nano chip somehow after making a successful test transaction (small sum) with the latest Electrum version. 2.7.12
Ever since that transaction went through, if I attempt to send from Ledger Wallet Bitcoin (on Chromium 54, Fedora 24) I get "Sending Failed: Unable to validate transaction" (with a red "x" on top). Before it outright fails, it stops at 96% for quite a while and hangs.
The two could have nothing to do with each other of course, since I haven't sent anything from the chrome app wallet in quite some time, I wouldn't have noticed if it otherwise stopped working.
I tried doing the 3x bad pin to reset, and then restoring, and that didn't work to aid in making a successful transaction, nor did attempting to re-flash the firmware (which honestly didn't seem to work because I guess it was already at 1.0.1?)
I'm not totally up shit's creek though because when I can get Electrum to connect to it properly, I can make successful transactions, just not from "Ledger Wallet Bitcoin" ("LWB").
To recap:
  1. I've tried LWB from legitimate Chrome 54, and Fedora's packaged Chromium 54 - Same result.
  2. I have tried #1 on two different systems with completely different hardware (a laptop and a desktop) - Same result
  3. I've tried resetting the chip via pin wiping, then restoring from seed - Same result after repeating #1 & #2
What I can't really try right now is another OS. I intentionally don't have any Windows systems, and am only Fedora 24 at the moment.
At times it's very difficult to get the Nano to connect on my laptop. I have to connect it and reconnect it several times for the app to recognize it, this specifically seems to be a combination of port specification (literal internal length and contacts) and perhaps some software incompatibility. While the laptop only seems to recognize it as XHCI, my desktop seems to have an easier time if I plug it into a legacy port using EHCI and always connects to the LWB app.
Recall though that despite those troubles, I can wipe it and restore the seed as many times I want successfully to the chip and that works fine with LWB, and I can also make transactions with it using Mycelium on Android, AND with Electrum on the desktop, which I'm not totally sure if that validates the chip itself as being totally ok.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Where should I go from here? I'd like to be able to send transactions from the chrome-based "LWB" app.
Does this situation improve with the Nano S? I'm looking to upgrade due to the FIDO capabilities.
submitted by overtmind to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

Windows 10 Mobile on the Lumia 1020

Let me start by saying I used Windowsphones of various kinds since 2010. My wife owns a 640 right now. Really loved the Nokia Lumia 1020 but last year I got an Android OnePlus One. Mainly one reason - apps. Specifically my UK bank, transit tickets, local taxi firm and others.
On Thursday I thought what the hell lets stick the Windows 10 beta on the Lumia device. Powered it up let it do the upgrade and then I checked it out.
It's beta so you dont expect smoothness. I took my sim out of the Android device and played. Cortana worked well, Outlook seems to be in there now and I will test Word tomorrow. What about my bank. Well no app there. My transit tickets. That would be no again.
Looked at the wallet. I have nfc on the phone. Nokia were building nfc in there for years. So Microsoft are going to support contactless payments with my credit card and debit card. That would be no again!
Actually the wallet seems to have almost no functionality at all. While having an Android device I got used to using the Mycelium Bitcoin wallet so I had hoped that Microsoft would have integrated Bitcoin into the mobile wallet experience. That would be no to that as well.
Now I had been using Paypal on Android to pay for breakfast on holiday in San Francisco back in May. So the Paypal app is there and it will work. No to that as well. I choose to use 2FA on the account and Paypal doesn't support that on it's Windows 10 Mobile devices.
You know I am going to use Windows 10 Mobile on the Lumia 1020 for a few weeks as my primary phone. I work in technology and I care about the Microsoft platform but it looks like I will have to go back to Android at some point reluctantly. I only have really looked into the wallet functionality so I wonder if the rest of the platform is as bad. Where apps even exist they seem way less functional than the Android/IOS ecosystem and I fully understand why Windowsphone has done so badly when I do these forward/back transisions.
submitted by ponsaelius to windowsphone [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Trading Intelligence [09.01.15]

Hope all is well guys. Our third Intelligence report is out. Again, thank you all very much for the feedback on our last Bitcoin Trading Intelligence newsletter. We hope we were able to address some of the issues from last time. Feedback and any other comments are welcome.
If you like this and want more, you can now reserve your spot in our Bitcoin Trading Intelligence platform. We haven't figured out pricing for the course yet. I would appreciate if you guys took a look at the Bitcoin Trading Intelligence platform and let me know what you think is a fair price for this. BTCVIX is our trader and with his real time alerts subscribers have a chance of making some serious money
Bitcoin in August
August has witnessed the rapid devaluation of Bitcoin, accelerated by fundamental data and augmented by technical glitches. The possible forking on the minds of the Bitcoin community, the repeated blows following the Mt Gox disaster and the effects of the BitLicense have cast a bearish shadow over the market which resulted in a month that managed to breach significant lows.
“After the stunning price action of the last couple weeks we have seen BTCUSD grind up the traders seeing patterns that aren’t there, complete chopfest. Rather than whittling away hard earned profits remember NO position IS a position — just need to know when them time is. Just like me, many other traders in the Whaleclub believe that sometimes not trading is a right decision and people should appreciate that.” BTCVIX, Professional Bitcoin Trader
Post the flash crash last week, the market has tested 200 and has been on a correction curve ever since. With many countries calling for increased regulation, let’s see how market emotions fared last week.
Nigeria’s central bank has called for Bitcoin regulation in order to stop money laundering and avoid international penalties. Dr. Okwu Nnanna the governor of the financial system at Nigeria’s Central Bank has cited that cryptocurrencies have no borders and hence are an easy channel for money laundering and thus there is a need to monitor them. AB 1236, a proposed California law to regulate virtual currencies has faced lot of opposition from industry lawyers.
It has now been amended saying companies that take ‘full custody’ of the currency are to be licensed and the bill is being backed by other major companies who are mostly made up of software developers. Another important country to look out for whose ecommerce demographic can play a pivotal role in the development of bitcoin system would be India.
With major companies like Microsoft and IBM backing bitcoin based startups, the Governor of RBI has made it clear that cryptocurrencies are being observed for now and would be regulated in the future.
The collapse of Mt Gox has racked up many controversies and the latest one, the arrest of Mark Karpeles, is over the issue of a fresh warrant for allegations that he has pocketed over $2.6 million from the company funds of Mt Gox. While Japan’s cryptocurrency scenario is restructuring for the best after the impact of Mt Gox, the Japanese Government has decided to regulate cryptocurrencies so as to avoid the risk of money laundering and terrorist funding.
How these coordinated regulations among different countries would affect/aid the growth and development of bitcoin is to be seen. While the ‘one-off’ depreciation of the Chinese Yuan has beaten the stock markets down in the USA and China, BTC China’s Greg Wolfson has remarked that the corresponding dip in prices in bitcoin is not devastating and in the times of uncertainty just like Gold, people are turning towards bitcoin as their safe haven.
The immediate correction after the dip is being seen as people hedge their positions in bitcoin.
Meanwhile on the Korean front, things are looking bright with a new exchange traded fund (ETF) tracking the value of bitcoin planned for launch on Korea Exchange next year.
This news coupled with Korean Bitcoin Exchange ‘Korbit’ announcing the launch of Bitwire, which allows people to send money using Bitcoin to any Korean bank account in less than two hours, the bitcoin ecosystem in Korea is trending towards a positive position.
On the European continent, the sentiment is consolidating with the launch of Mycelium Gear with Cashila’s API being integrated, this enables merchants to accept bitcoins that are automatically converted to Euros.
The financial crisis in Greece is here to stay for some time and bitcoin services providers like Cubit are trying to do what they can to help. Cubit in coordination with BTC-Greece is helping Greek citizens move their money out of the country to business partners and suppliers.
The aim is to try and work around the various capital controls that have been enforced in Greece in the hope that some private businesses can get back up and running once more. They have plans to install 1000 ATMS in order to make the this work. Even in the Black Sea Basin there are more than 13,600 locations where you can access bitcoin related stores, ATM and service providers.
On a corporate front, things have been picking up pace with Intel expressing its intention to unify the Internet of Things with bitcoin transactions. World Wide Web creator Tim-Berners-Lee leads the W3C to establish online payment standards, including Bitcoin, another sign of positive acceptance.
UBS’s Alex Batlin’s statements about Blockchain, saying that the technology will be an opportunity or threat to companies like UBS basing on how quick they act on it, has once again clarified that the technology is here to stay and is slowly gaining traction.
Patrick Byrne, the founder of Overstock.com, has acquired a broker-dealer firm built deep into the DNA of Wall Street. When the technology at the center of the acquisition is switched on, Byrne said, it will mark the first time the decentralized ledger behind bitcoin is plugged directly into Wall Street. This way it will be possible to bridge the gap between bitcoin technology and the blockchain.
With Coinbase reaching a valuation of $1 billion, it is listed as one of the top 50 tech startups in the USA. Fortifying their market share, they have launched services to purchase bitcoins through debit cards and credit cards and most recently launched in Canada.
While the service providing companies are doing well, the exchanges have taken a back step last week. The Bitfinex trade engine was blamed for the flash crash and many people experienced problems with exiting their positions during the crash, Australian Exchange, iGot, halted their trading activity and this has led to angst among its traders and customers.
So in conclusion, it is fair to say this past week of has seen lots turmoil in bitcoin trading with loads of negative factors contributing to the market sentiment bearish.
Long Term Technical Analysis
On a weekly scale, the market has tested its long term support level at 200 and retraced quickly to 227. The bearish arc of this swing was a strong move ranging over a month, driven by fundamental factors. The Bollinger bands in the weekly chart still remain parallel showing that the market is in bounds and judging by the regression lines, is setting up for a bull trend after consolidation.
On a long term scale, RSI is approaching oversold region while MACD just took a bearish turn crossing the signal line. Since the market is yet to consolidate, taking a long term position right as of now wouldn’t be feasible. Short term trades around 224 region with stop loss around the lows of previous week’s candle, targeting 5 SMA would be feasible. Long term trades can be planned on basis of consolidation. As soon as both Bollinger and 5 SMA become trending in the upward direction after significant consolidation, entering into trades with a long term plan would be profitable. Proper entry points for such trades would be around 220 region with stops below 217. With Market trending, possible exit points could be 266, 300 and 317.
If the market breaks out on the downside, breaking the support zone at 200, possible targets can be 157 and further drop in prices would seem likely.
Midterm Technical Analysis
In the daily chart, the support encountered around 217 region was breached and market has now found long term support at 200. With the Bollinger bands and SMA’s pointing downwards, the setup is going to remain bearish for some time until a base of consolidation is formed. The descending triangle as shown in the daily chart between the downward trend line and support line at 200 might possibly see good number of volumes being traded in the coming days. In which direction the break out would be or the setup would change will depend on how the market approaches the vertex of the triangle.
If the Bollinger bands and short term SMA’s don’t straighten out or change direction, the break out might as well be in the downward direction, continuing the set trend. The MACD is about to cross the signal line and turn bullish, RSI has crossed 30 from the downside indicating impending bullishness in the market but when the bull run takes off is to be seen.
In the medium term, it appears that it is going to be bearish/sideways for some time. Shorting opportunities at the trend line and retracement trades with 5 SMA as support hold good potential.
Short term Technical Analysis
On a short term scale, the market has retraced over 220 levels and is expected to trade in this range for some time before either consolidating and going for a reversal or crashing down further more.
We can observe that 100 SMA is offering good support and market has not been able to go beyond 34 SMA. Picking longs over 100 SMA with 34 SMA as target would be a good short term trade. With the Bollinger bands and SMA’s still pointing downwards and higher time frame charts supporting, shorting around 34 SMA would be a good option.
The possible targets for such trades would be 100 SMA and if the market gets further trendy, a crash down back to 200 levels can also be expected, although these trades have to be done with tight stop loss. The MACD and RSI don’t give much indication as the market is sideways in the short term and retracing.
Sentiment Analysis
This week saw a lot of action with countries announcing regulation moves and unveiling of technologies which ease bitcoin and blockchain adoption. While the sentiment was bearish majorly, let’s take a look at what happened in the market:
The Bank of England has announced that Bitcoin is ‘harder money’ than Gold because of Deflation. During a presentation on digital currencies, Andy Haldane, Chief Economist and the Executive Director of Monetary Analysis and Statistics of the Bank of England stated the above statement explaining that sustained adoption would see ongoing deflation.
An article from ibtimes has given a thorough analysis of how adopting blockchain technology to the existing banking system would be difficult and how Deutsche bank’s economist sees blockchain as a threat because of the lack of the IT infrastructure to support the technology involved. On educational front, Stanford has joined NYU and Duke University in offering bitcoin course, Princeton has launched its own bitcoin course on Coursera, strengthening the sentiment that cryptocurrencies are here to stay and further studies and research in these fields embedded into the course work is a strong possibility.
On the technological front, with e-coin launching Bitcoin Debit card affiliate program, which aims at bridging the gap between traditional financial services and bitcoin, it’s now possible to load bitcoins into debit cards and make payments for the transactions. With Coinbase also enabling purchase of bitcoin through debit-card/credit-card, we are now in a transformative phase where the traditional financial services are being used to develop and adopt systems that would be framework for the future bitcoin usage.
How the technology will evolve to accommodate or change the traditional banking system is to be seen.
Developments in Blockchain
On August 20th, Nasdaq revealed its plans with the underlying technology of Bitcoin and Blockchain. In an interview with efinancialnews Fredrik Voss, Vice President and head of Blockchain strategy at Nasdaq answered questions about how the program is progressing and what other applications Nasdaq is thinking of.
Nasdaq is planning to launch the private market initiative later this year and is clearly looking at commercial uses for the Blockchain now. The application of distributed ledgers in financial markets for things like settlement and custody, to create efficiency in back-office processes is the primary aim.
Another application of Blockchain this week would be the launch of John McAfee SwiftMail which is a new free peer-to-peer, proof-of-work, encrypted mail system that uses the technology underlying Bitcoin to replace email. The system is said to have very high encryption as privacy is one of the key aspects of SwiftMail.
Technocorner
On the techspace, what has been hogging all the limelight is the new chip for Antminer S7 by Bitmain that is believed to be more powerful than its predecessor. Bitmain, the bitcoin mining ASIC provider, announced on August 20th it is launching its fourth-generation ASIC, the BM1385. This chip is claimed to generate a 45 percent increase in hashrate while needing 50 percent less electricity than its former chip, the BM1384.
Another interesting development would be Netcoins which can supposedly turn any device (iPad, Android devices) into a bitcoin ATM. It is ideally designed for retailers to enable transactions in bitcoin and attract tech savvy customers.
News that’s also been doing rounds is about the Mike Tyson ATM. While initially the prospect was heralded to be a scam, the ATM was launched in Las Vegas with Bitcoin Direct backing the launch.
While security threats in Windows 10 has put the wallet developers in a tight situation, the iOS space is now crowded with launch of new wallets everyday making it hard for the users to choose from the many apps. Most people believe that the advanced bitcoin demographic belongs to iOS users and this is the primary reason for the competition while some say that the lack of a secure wallet in Android and security issues with Windows has led to this development.
For the same report with the Technical Graphs please see the original post: Bitcoin Trading Intelligence: September 1st, 2015
submitted by blockstreet_ceo to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Ideas for really safe Cold Storage

The Three Legged Stool of safe storage. I've given a lot of thought about how I can safely store my Bitcoins. I want to share my method in the hope others may find this helpful and any discussion could also help me. I'm not intending this as a beginners guide to cold storage, plenty already exist. But people, both new and familiar with cold storage, can benefit from the applications and ideas I'm suggesting here.
The Three Legged Stool, what's this about? There are just three ways to unintentionally lose your coins: Leg 1, They can be stolen Leg 2, They can be physically lost Leg 3, You can forget how to access them
The snag is that anything done to improve security to one Leg tends to increase the risk of loss caused by being out of balance with the other two Legs. For example, to protect your coins against Leg 1 (being stolen) you may hide the coins private key in a password protected container somewhere in your house. My point is that you have reduced the risk of Leg 1 (getting them stolen) but at the same time increased the risk of Leg 2 (physically lost) and Leg 3 (forget the password). This is especially true with long term storage. Equally, not using a password protects against Leg 3 but increases the risks from Leg 1 and is of no help against Leg 2. The objective is a balanced stool, keeping your coins safe and also always available for spending.
How it can be done: My preferred method is using Paper Wallets with BIP38 encryption. With secure passwords, these are so safe you can keep multiple copies of the same wallet all over the place. Keep copies at work, at home, at your parents house and even carry the private key QR code with your phone in case you want to spend a chunk of Bitcoins unexpectedly. Brute force attacks on BIP38 wallets are so slow, I can't think it's possible to crack a strong password of let's say 10 random letters, numbers and symbols. So this is total protection against Leg 1 and Leg 2 but forget that password Leg 3.... and your coins are gone forever!
Here's the clever bit. So how can you guarantee never to forget that complex wallet password? Yes! There's an App for that, "Infinite Password Generator" (IPG) is truly brilliant. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=yuku.infinitepassgen.app
The only permission this App has is to access Google Play payment services so I don't think it can give any secrets back to the developer. Install this app and make backups of the APK, save backups on several devices in case it's ever removed from Google Play. If you change your phone you will want to be able to install IPG from your APK backups and it's best not to update this App. If you do update it then always check it is generating the same passwords using the procedure explained below.
IPG generates complex passwords by combining your own "Master Password" with a Keyword. As an example, your Master Password must be something you can NEVER forget like the house number and road name you lived in as a child. The Keyword is a unique identifier for this Paper Wallet, maybe a name and incrementing sequence number like wallet3. IPG combines these two fields to generate a secure repeatable password you can use as the input to the BIP38 encryption.
IPG let's you save its configuration settings and you need to do this: Fill in the Master Password, put your name in the Keyword field, press Show and select the type and length of BIP38 password you want then press Copy (to the clipboard). Now, paste the generated password over the Personal notes (optional) field. Next, delete the Master Password field and Save, then exit IPG.
Open IPG and Load your saved file, fill in Master Password then Copy/paste the generated password under the original copy of the password and if you did this all correctly you will have generated exactly the same password, confirming you put in the Master Password correctly. Now change the Keyword field to your chosen Wallet Identifier, let's use my example above wallet3 and this will generate the required unique password for that BIP38 Paper Wallet you're about to make. I would write 3 as a hint on all copies of this Paper Wallet to make sure I don't forget the full Keyword. The next Paper Wallet I generate being wallet4, marked 4. Also I paste a copy of the IPG generated password into a Truecrypt encrypted container as a last chance disaster recovery.
Final steps to use IPG safely. You must close this App correctly otherwise it stays a while in memory containing all your secret information. Then you need to clear the clipboard of the wallet password and I've been using an App called Clipboard Autoclear+ to do this. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.tactilesoftworks.clipboardsentinel
I've used two Paper Wallet generators, my favorite is https://www.bitaddress.org but it's a bit cumbersome to produce multiple copies of the same wallet. I also like https://bitcoinpaperwallet.com because they can produce Testnet Wallets which is a coin identical to Bitcoin but uses valueless coins purely to be for testing purposes. Google Testnet Wallets for more info.
Spending from your Paper Wallet is easier to do than explain and I started by using the Blockchain.info Android App. But this has let me down with an error message "insufficient funds" and I see many complaints about this problem. I wrote to Blockchain.info about it but got no reply. Since then I moved to Mycelium Wallet https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mycelium.wallet and have had no problems with this. Also they do a Testnet version of Mycelium which is incredibly useful.
In Mycelium you just scan your Paper Wallets public address to watch how many Bitcoins there are in them. When you want to spend from the Paper Wallet, first run IPG, load the file and fill in the passwords then copy the Paper Wallet password to the clipboard. During the Send transaction Mycelium will ask to scan the wallet Private Key, it then asks for the BIP38 password which you can paste in from IPG and the amount of Bitcoin to send and off it goes.
A couple of important points to consider if you're not spending the full amount from the Paper Wallet. Once your private key has been used like this you really should send the remaining Bitcoins the next Paper Wallet in the sequence called, using my example, wallet4. That's because once a private key has been used or exposed to an online device, it's no longer safe to consider it as cold storage. If you don't spend all the coins on your Paper Wallet it's likely you will get back change and you must be sure the Wallet App you're using supports this or your change will disappear as a donation to the mining community. Mycelium and Blockchain.info Wallets automatically look after sending your change back to the Paper Wallet's corresponding public address. OTHER APPS MIGHT NOT DO THIS SO BE CAREFUL.
Generating Paper Wallets should be done on an offline device such as an old Android phone factory reset and only used for this purpose or a bootable Linux USB.
In conclusion this approach overcomes my doubts about my ability to remember long term secure passwords, possibly years after I made them up, because I shouldn't forget the Master Password as it's something so personal to me and the Keyword is almost attached to the Paper Wallet. Leg 3 is dealt with and Legs 2 and 3 now take care of themselves.
I do hope some of you find these ideas helpful. The developer of IPG Yukuku does not make any provision for donations and I would happily make a donation for this excellent App that is also available for Windows.
Disclaimer, these ideas are for your consideration and debate only. I take no responsibility whatsoever for any losses that may arise however they are incurred. I have absolutely no connection or financial interest in any of the applications I have referred to here.
submitted by LeScarecrow to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Bounties] Bug Hunters and Testers.

Testnet.BitcoinReserve.ch is looking for a few good bug hunters.
Offering $75 in BTC for fatal bugs and a sliding scale all the way down to $2 for minor typos.
Bitcoin Reserve allows deposit and withdrawal of Bitcoin, conversion to/from dollars and payments to other members in USD or BTC. The system is currently running on Testnet3.
I am the final and only arbiter of bounty payouts. The first person to find and report a particular bug will be paid a bounty. Subsequent reports on the same issue are helpful but will be paid a partial bounty only if they add worthwhile information. Be sure to include the URL and any supporting information with your bug reports: Bugs must be reproducible or otherwise independently observable (i.e. reviewing server logs). Larger bounties will be paid to the address you send me through a reddit personal message, smaller bounties will be paid through changetip. If bounty payouts end up exceeding 3 BTC, the contest will be paused as we examine what the hell is going on.
/BitcoinReserve has been setup to handle bug reports and discussion.
Notes:
Happy Hunting!
Again, the website is https://testnet.bitcoinreserve.ch and post bugs to our subreddit /BitcoinReserve
submitted by ReportingThisHere to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

www.AutoFwd.com/bitcoin

I thought I'd share my AutoFwd link should anyone find it helpful when telling people how to install a Bitcoin wallet on their phone or PC.
(AutoFwd detects the platform that clicked the link and redirects based on the platform)
This http://www.autofwd.com/bitcoin short link is set for the following wallets
iOS devices - Bread Wallet from AppStore
Android devices - Mycelium from Google Play
Win/Mac - Electrum from electrum.org
Windows Phone 8 - bitcoin.org.... I couldn't find a WP8 wallet?? Open to suggestions!
Blackberry - Bitcoin wallet from marketplace
submitted by 5tu to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

[Informational] [CC0] On Storing Bitcoin

It's said that Bitcoin allows someone to be their own bank. This means that when it comes to money Bitcoin users are only beholden to themselves: no third party can dictate to a Bitcoin user how they may spend their money. However this principle of self-determination also means that when it comes to security Bitcoin users have only themselves to rely upon.
There are a wide variety of ways to use Bitcoin, which means that securing Bitcoin is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Generally though, there are two recommended configurations for using Bitcoins: hot and cold wallets. Hot wallets optimize for ease of spending and movement, cold wallets go the other way and optimize for difficulty of movement to prevent theft.

Hot Wallets

Hot wallets are where Bitcoin commerce happens, coins can flow in and out with the minimum of resistance needed to prevent theft. There are many use cases where a hot wallet is appropriate: receiving payments from third parties, making small daily purchases at points of sale, regular or bulk fund transfers to generic endpoints, and converting to fiat to send an outside currency.

Receiving Payments

For receiving payments, it's recommended that the highest levels of validation be used. Even receiving funds from a trusted person may be suspect, the chain of trust is only as solid as its weakest link, if the trusted person re-sends coins from an untrusted third party, then the trusted person's funds cannot be trusted.
A strong user flow for this use-case is to use a strongly validating wallet as a proxy. Any funds that are known to have been validated by a strongly validating wallet are safe, even when transferred to a weakly validating wallet: the worst case scenario being that they do not transfer to the weakly validating wallet successfully.
Recommended strongly validating wallet:

Mobile Payments

For sending payments on the go or casual payments online, a mobile wallet is seen as a fairly secure option. Although it's unwise to store large amounts on a mobile wallet due to the risk of device loss or theft, a small amount of money on an iPhone or Android is seen as practical as long as those platforms' default security mechanisms have not been bypassed and well-vetted software is used.
Recommended well-vetted mobile wallets:

Regular Spending

For transferring larger amounts of funds or making payments from small to large, it's useful to have a wallet that tempers extreme security with ease-of-use. The most effective way to achieve this utility is through the use of MultiSig, a feature of Bitcoin that allows multiple independent signatories to cryptographically sign off on outgoing fund transfers. This method is seen as highly secure: an attacker attempting to purloin funds must simultaneously compromise multiple independent devices in order to perform an unauthorized spend.
Other security methods are possible that separate and isolate potential attackers, such as crafting transactions on an offline or single purpose computer, but the inconvenience of those methods may lead to their disuse, whereas a multiple signature flow can be simple and closely follows the general security industry best practice of requiring multiple factors for authentication. Using a desktop wallet for regular spending is recommended, due to the standard desktop security model that places reduced trust in the platform vendor.
Recommended MultiSig wallets

Fiat Spending

A Bitcoin user may stand apart from fiat and never touch it, but in practical reality no man is an island and the necessity or desire to interact with a fiat accepting merchant or a less enlightened individual may arise. To ease this process, custodial wallets and debit cards have been developed as compact convenient fiat exchanges. A user simply stores some Bitcoin with a service; when a fiat spend is requested the service automatically performs a market trade and completes the spend. Although generally speaking custodial wallets are not recommended, in the case of spending fiat they are a practical best solution.
Recommended Fiat Spending Solutions

Cold Storage

Many users of Bitcoin have absolutely no need to access the majority of their funds on a day to day basis. To take advantage of this fact, these users can dramatically improve the security of their funds by placing them in a difficult to access cold storage wallet. Many solutions have been created for this use case, but generally speaking there are two broadly useful ways to accomplish cold storage: hardware wallets and HD backup seeds.

Hardware Wallet

From a security perspective all software wallets are extremely problematic: they share a platform with other programs, any one of which may be malicious and abscond with user funds. Platform security features, dedicated computers, or software defensive programming can mitigate the problem but from a logical security perspective the surface area open to attack is much wider than absolutely necessary. A hardware wallet device addresses this problem by being designed specifically to be logically separate and single purpose, minimizing risk of unauthorized fund transfer.
Recommended hardware wallets:

Backup Phrase

Every wallet stores a set of data called private keys, these keys are simply secret random numbers that are used to sign all fund transfers. If wallet files are deleted, and no backup is made, this can mean a loss of funds for the wallet owner: since he can no longer sign a transfer, he can no longer spend his funds.
To avoid this scenario, all that is needed is a backup of the private keys. Not only is this important for securing funds, it can be used as a method to secure funds in a cold way. By deliberately and securely erasing a hot wallet and keeping the backup out of the reach of any network or computer, the funds are logically separated it from the possibility of remote theft.
The best way to accomplish this is a durable and simple system called a Hierarchical Deterministic Seed, or HD seed, a system formalized in Pieter Wuille's Bitcoin Improvement Proposal BIP 32. Essentially, this backup scheme specifies a single random number that is used as a starting seed to deterministically generate a lot of other random numbers, or private keys, to be used by a wallet instead of many individual isolated random numbers that must be collectively backed up.
The big advantage to this system is the extreme ease of backup and restoration: a seed can be encoded as a simple set of twelve words, which are easily written down. Users should keep at least three copies of their seed in separate, secure places, inclusive with a software or hardware wallet using the seed. Various mechanisms exist to improve the durability of stored seeds: laminated paper, safe deposit boxes, safes, etc. Writing down the seed is preferable to printing, as printers and the chain of printing may leak a copy along the way.
submitted by pb1x to writingforbitcoin [link] [comments]

[ANN] Mycelium's new Local Trader feature will let anyone be an ATM

Announcement (posted to multiple sources)
This Wednesday, at the Inside Bitcoins conference in Berlin, the team behind the Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet and the much anticipated yet continuously delayed BitcoinCard, will demo a major new feature of their wallet, called Local Trader. This new feature is a person to person exchange, similar to LocalBitcoins.com, built directly into the bitcoin wallet software. As Jan Møller, one of Mycelium’s lead developers explains, “Mycelium Local Trader is a trading platform for the Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet which allows users to buy and sell Bitcoin. The initial idea comes from one of the biggest problems in Bitcoin: How to get your first bitcoins?”
The feature is still being finalized, but is fully functional on testnet, and is expected to be released later this month. At first, the trader options will be limited to “Continuous Seller,” where someone creates an offer to sell bitcoins and waits for buyers, and “Instant Buyer,” where someone who wants bitcoins right now can browse a list of sell offers in their area, and ping one to ask for a trade. When asked why the option to instantly sell bitcoins for cash was not available yet, Jan commented, “We wanted to attack what we believe is the most common problem: Getting your first BTC.”
Image 1
To set up a sale offer, the user first has to load their bitcoin wallet with some bitcoins. Since both the wallet and the trading platform are within the same app, the seller profile actually knows if they really have coins to sell. Once the seller presses the “Sell Bitcoin” button, Local Trader automatically registers one of the wallet’s bitcoin addresses on the exchange server as the key associated with the seller account. Like PGP, this bitcoin address and private key are used to authenticate with the trading server, where your user id, sell offers, trade history, and reputation are stored. Likewise, the private key is used to authenticate API requests to the server, a method that may mitigate the API key theft issues recently experienced by some exchanges, and in the future may be used to authenticate and possibly encrypt communications between users. For now, it just keeps all communications secure, and has the added benefit of being able to import your trade account, along with all its history, simply by importing the associated private key from a backup.
Image 2
In the Sell Order menu, users can create sale orders that include their location (obfuscated to a 1km square block), the exchange used for the price, seller fee, minimum and maximum amount they are willing to sell, and a custom message that buyers will be able to see when they select their offer. Sellers are not limited to the amount of sale offers they can create, and can make sell offers with different fees for different amount traded, different locations, and even set negative fees if they need to swap their bitcoins for cash quickly.
For anyone looking to buy bitcoins, they just have to press “Buy Bitcoin,” and they are instantly presented with a list of 20 closest offers in their area, sorted by distance using their phone’s GPS. Here, buyers can see offer details, such as nickname of the seller, their rating, price, distance, and minimum and maximum they are willing to trade. Clicking on an offer also expands it to show any custom notes the seller may have included. Initiating a buy offer is as simple as typing the amount you wish to buy into the text entry field on the seller’s offer, and selecting Buy.
Image 3
Once an offer is accepted, the seller’s wallet receives a notification, and the trading app switches to a window where the buyer and seller can see the amount and the price being offered, as well as a chat window they can use to negotiate the terms and location of the trade. The price can be changed and refreshed to the more recent exchange price as many times as the traders want before they agree on the trade, up to the point where they meet and swap cash. When each of them agrees on the terms, they hit Accept Offer, and the trade will only be considered accepted when both of them have agreed. However, the trade must go through within 24 hours of the buyer’s initial offer, otherwise it gets automatically aborted. Once the two traders meet, the buyer hands cash to the seller, the seller hits “Cash Received,” and bitcoins are automatically sent to the sellers wallet, minus whatever fees were negotiated on.
Image 4
Another brand new feature that comes with Local Trader, which will likely be ported to other parts of the wallet, is the “Transaction Confidence” graph. Since Mycelium servers are connected to hundreds, if not thousands, of nodes, they are able to track transaction propagation through the network in real time. Transaction Confidence, expressed in percent, shows a close estimate of how much of the overall Bitcoin network has heard about the transaction. The idea is that, if most of the network has already heard about the transaction, double-spending it becomes much more difficult, and the chances of it being included in the next block approach 100%. So, if the confidence is high enough (it reaches high 90’s within a few seconds), you can be fairly sure that this transaction will be included in the block, and do in person trades with zero block confirmations. No more awkward waiting for 10 minutes (or sometimes as long as 50 as I had the unfortunate experience of at a local McDonald’s) just to make sure that both people are confident enough the transaction won’t fail.
Trader feedback is the only feature still undergoing the final stages of development, and will be automatically calculated based on the number and size of successful trades, response times, and trade aborts. For their part, Mycelium plans to charge about 0.5% per transaction for the service, but, like LocalBitcoin, will not object to people using the service to trade directly, bypassing the fee, since they believe enough people will find the convenience of trading directly through their system, along with maintaining a trade history and reputation, to be worth the small fee.
submitted by Rassah to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

A guide on bitcoin

A few people have asked me about how to buy bitcoin and how to use bitcoin. So I thought I'd write a quick guide on how to buy bitcoin and how to send bitcoin. At the end I give some bonus information on what bitcoin is and how it works. Bitcoin is best demonstrated rather than explained and most people just want to jump right in and get some to see for themselves, so I'll start this guide with how to buy some and how to send people money with it. Plus most people reading this might only be interested in sending their league dues.

BUYING BITCOIN

There are a number of ways to purchase bitcoin all of them relatively easy. I will recommend two of the most popular ways to buy bitcoin.
Coinbase Coinbase is probably the most popular exchange in the world. Coinbase is very easy to use and is probably the cheapest place to buy bitcoins. This is my recommended way to purchase bitcoins. You will need to connect your account to a US checking account via the ACH system.
Circle circle allows you to purchase bitcoin using a credit card or debit card. I haven't purchased through them, but I believe they require ID verification so it may take some time to setup. not too sure.
Libertyx Libertx is a very simple way to purchase bitcoins. You go to a Libertyx location and tell the cashier you are purchasing a libertyx pin. you give the cashier the amount you want in cash and they give you a receipt with a pin number. Enter that pin number in your account on libertyx and bitcoin is deposited to your account.
Localbitcoins Localbitcoins is probably the fastest way to purchase bitcoins. You can go to the website and find someone in your area that is selling bitcoins for cash. If you find someone you want to buy from, you open a trade with that person and plan to meet in a public place like starbucks. This method doesn't require you to link a bank account. This method will be a little more expensive than purchasing through an exchange like coinbase.
Find a bitcoin ATM Bitcoin ATM's are popping up around the country. Each of them work a little differently and any exchange fees are set by the owner. So how expensive they are depends on the one you are using. To use an ATM you deposit cash and bitcoins are deposited into your bitcoin wallet.

SENDING AND RECEIVING BITCOINS

Bitcoin Wallets A bitcoin wallet is used to store your bitcoin, send bitcoin, and receive bitcoin. You can think of it like as an email account. If you are using coinbase, Libertyx, or localbitcoins then you are already given a bitcoin wallet with your account. If you only plan to use bitcoin for the one purpose of sending your league dues, then this may be all you need and you won't need to bother having an additional app on your phone or computer (skip ahead to sending bitcoins). But, if you are interested in using bitcoins then you should look into what wallet applications are available. Bitcoin.org has a great guide on what wallets are available. Look over which ones are available for each platform. Here are my personal recommendations for each platform. * Android: Mycelium * iOS: greenaddress * Windows: greenaddress * Mac: Electrum
I haven't used android or mac, but have heard good things about mycelium and electrum. A note about some of these web wallets. Many of them will require users to protect their account with as much security as possible. This is because bitcoin is a lot like cash and you are responsible for keeping it safe. A strong password and other measures are important to keeping your bitcoins secure.
Send bitcoin Every wallet has a send feature. You should be able to find this feature by going to the "send bitcoin" tab someplace in your wallet. Sending bitcoin will always require two pieces of information: 1) Who are you sending it to? Every wallet has a bitcoin address that can be shared with other people to receive payments. If you are sending someone bitcoin you must ask for their bitcoin address to send to. For example my bitcoin address is: 3Epf4PDbu3yMQbJDNzbfQDwnFfzufovVvd . I can share this address with anyone in the world and they can send money to it. Since the address is very long and hard to type out, a QR code is usually associated with it so that smartphones can scan the code for easier input. Here is the associated QR code with that address. This payment address is where you can send bitcoins as payment for the league dues.
2) How much are you sending? The amount in bitcoins you send depends on the exchange rate you are using. If you are only using bitcoin to send your buy in price, then you just need to send the amount you just purchased. Many applications have built in conversion calculators. You can enter in the amount in dollars and it will convert it automatically to the amount in bitcoins you need to send. To see live conversion rates you can use a website to view various market rates. A couple popular ones are bitcoinaverage and tradeblock. Bitcoin average provides a volume weighted average price of bitcoin across multiple exchanges. Tradeblock gives live rates across multiple exchanges. You can see the prices of each online exchange changing in the top right corner of the page. For example: at the time of this writing bitcoin is trading at $282.14 per bitcoin on coinbase. If you were to send $20 using this exchange rate, you would send 0.071 bitcoins.
Receive bitcoin If you are only reading this to send your buy in fee then you don't need to read further. If you're interested in learning more about bitcoin then you can continue reading. Receiving bitcoin is easier than sending bitcoin. All you need to do is give someone your receiving address. Every wallet has a receiving address. You can see the example of mine above. you will be able to find this in your web wallet.

BONUS INFORMATION ON HOW BITCOIN WORKS, WHY IT'S SO POPULAR, AND HOW YOU CAN MAKE MONEY

What is bitcoin? Andreas Antonopoulos explains bitcoin the best in his book Mastering Bitcoin.
Bitcoin is a collection of concepts and technologies that form the basis of a digital money ecosystem. Units of currency called bitcoins are used to store and transmit value among participants in the bitcoin network. Bitcoin users communicate with each other using the bitcoin protocol primarily via the Internet, although other transport networks can also be used. The bitcoin protocol stack, available as open source software, can be run on a wide range of computing devices, including laptops and smart phones, making the technology easily accessible.
Unlike traditional currencies, bitcoins are entirely virtual. There are no physical coins, or even digital coins per se. The coins are implied in transactions that transfer value from sender to recipient. Users of bitcoin own keys that allow them to prove ownership of transactions in the bitcoin network, unlocking the value to spend it and transfer it to a new recipient. Those keys are often stored in a digital wallet on each user’s computer. Possession of the key that unlocks a transaction is the only prerequisite to spending bitcoins, putting the control entirely in the hands of each user.
Bitcoin is a distributed, peer-to-peer system. As such, there is no central server or point of control. Bitcoins are created through a process called “mining,” which involves looking for a solution to a difficult problem. Any participant in the bitcoin network (i.e., any device running the full bitcoin protocol stack) may operate as a miner, using their computer’s processing power to attempt to find solutions to this problem. Every 10 minutes on average, a new solution is found by someone who then is able to validate the transactions of the past 10 minutes and is rewarded with brand new bitcoins. Essentially, bitcoin mining decentralizes the currency-issuance and clearing functions of a central bank and replaces the need for any central bank with this global competition.
Why is it so popular? and Why does it have value? These can be hard questions to answer. Bitcoin has advantages over traditional currencies. First thing to understand is that bitcoin is not a currency it's merely a transfer of value written on a public ledger. Currency is just the first application of bitcoin. Bitcoin is like the internet of money, a network for propagating value and securing the ownership of digital assets via distributed computation. There is a lot more to bitcoin than first meets the eye. Here are a few important qualities that make bitcoin popular and gives it value to people:
How you can make money with bitcoin It's very easy to make money with bitcoin just by sitting at your computer doing nothing. I will list a few methods here:
1) Sell bitcoins on localbitcoins If you have cheap access to bitcoins on coinbase then you can sell bitcoins for cash at a profit. Simply create an advertisement to locally sell bitcoins on localbitcoins and set your price 5% above coinbase. When someone contacts you through the website, you buy their bitcoins on coinbase and then sell it to them for 5% higher than you just bought it for. This sounds ridiculous, but people are willing to pay 5% more to skip setting up a coinbase account and purchasing on localbitcoins. If you are interested in doing this you can read my advertisement.
2) Sell bitcoins for amazon gift cards People are willing to pay a lot more money for the convenience of buying bitcoins with gift cards. You can sell your bitcoins online for amazon gift cards on paxful.com or localbitcoins.com. I have sold my bitcoins at up to 50% markup on paxful.com.
3) Save money using bitcoins to buy stuff on amazon and starbucks Yes! That's correct! you can actually use bitcoins to buy stuff on amazon and starbucks. The website https://purse.io/ lets you purchase stuff on amazon using bitcoin. You create a wishlist on amazon, paste your wishlist on purse.io and send bitcoins to the wallet they give you. You can save up to 15-20% pretty easily using this method. If you want to buy starbucks at a 5% discount you can use https://coffee.foldapp.com/.
4) Play the market You can also buy your bitcoins and hold on to them and try to sell them later at a higher price. The price of bitcoin can go up and down like a stock. You can also try to buy them on one exchange and sell them at another exchange at a higher price. This way of making money can be risky and not as profitable as the ones above.
5) Invest in startup companies Bitlendingclub lists startup companies and bitcoin traders that are asking for loans in bitcoin. You can find a user on that site and invest in their company. It's up to you to find someone trustworthy and who you which users have the best chance at being successful.
6) Gambling! There are several online casinos and betting agencies that accept bitcoin. cloudbet.com has an online casino and sports betting. Nitrogensports is the go to for online sports betting.
This is all I have for now. This should be more than enough to get started with. If you are interested in learning more or have questions you can contact me.
submitted by scipio314 to PickSixComeback [link] [comments]

[p0] The best notebook-type program I've ever discovered, OneNote, is only available on Windows

Problems:
* no good standing desk at hubud * Inka Pen discontinued * Inka pen ink cartridge tip design flaw to impact 
Ongoing collection of problems here: http://www.evernote.com/l/AFuQaZs4nfxM0o5gf7_VM8LzF6t3r5UyYfY/
submitted by Razaberry to HTSASprojects [link] [comments]

Basic Bitcoin software questions

What is the difference between accessing Bitcoin online (through Blockchain for instance) and using a Bitcoin software? What exactly does the Bitcoin software do? Pros/cons? Specific software you would like to recommend?
Also, from a guide that was posted here recently (link):
2.3 Send/spend -- You need an app in order to send/spend bitcoins out of your stash into someone else's. I recommend Android. Get an Android tablet or smartphone. Windows is too insecure to handle money. Linux is too hard to master for the casual person just wanting to get a few coins to play with. Macintosh lacks mature bitcoin-sending apps. I recommend Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet. Other apps currently on the market ("Bitcoin", "Armory", "Electrum", "Multibit", and many others) perform functions beyond a casual user's needs. They are therefore more complex and so are harder to master.
Any secondary opinions on this? How exactly is Android bettebest?
Hope that wasn't too much. Thank you.
submitted by twignewton to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

New to Android. Questions about 2FA, backups and apps

Hello good people of reddit. As my journey to understanding how to secure your online and mobile wallets continues, I am now ready to consider buying an Android phone and setting up 2FA on one or more online wallets. Some questions for you.
1) Android: do the popular ones like Mycelium and Blockchain.info apps let you back up your wallet with the keys and if so, can it be done to an SD card?
2) If I buy an Android phone that has internal memory only, how can I back up the wallet data? I hope to avoid saving anything in the "cloud" and instead make a physical back up...can I connect to a Windows PC to do it?
3) 2FA: I understands Google authenticator is for iPhone and Android phones and MS has their own app but my question is, if I add the 2FA option to an online exchange account, does the authenticator generate a code via SMS (so I need at least a mobile text plan active) or do I need a data plan. You see I am used to using a basic mobile phone with just talk and text, so I am new to smartphones with data plans and apps.
4) When using apps like Bitcoin Paranoid which I understand is to send alerts, how much data does it usually use per month?
In conclusion, I need to figure out how much data the mobile wallet and other apps use but want to limit my spending to prepaid plans instead of post paid so I don't get a surprise bill of $1000 at the end of the month from my phone provider. Thank you for your time, I will find a way to reward the best answers once I get settled.
submitted by losgalapagos to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

New to Android, 2FA and app data backups

Hello good people of reddit. As my journey to understanding how to secure your online and mobile wallets continues, I am now ready to consider buying an Android phone and setting up 2FA on one or more online wallets. Some questions for you.
1) Android apps: if you use Bitcoin (sorry, no reply in their beginner's section yet), do the popular apps like Mycelium and Blockchain.info apps let you back up your wallet with the keys and if so, can it be done to an SD card?
2) If I buy an Android phone that has internal memory only, how can I back up the app's wallet data? I hope to avoid saving anything in the "cloud" and instead make a physical back up...can I connect to a Windows PC to do it?
3) 2FA: I understands Google authenticator is for iPhone and Android phones and MS has their own app but my question is, if I add the 2FA option to an online exchange account, does the authenticator generate a code via SMS (so I need at least a mobile text plan active) or do I need a data plan. You see I am used to using a basic mobile phone with just talk and text, so I am new to smartphones with data plans and apps.
4) When using apps like Bitcoin Paranoid which I understand is to send alerts, how much data does it usually use per month?
In conclusion, I need to figure out how much data the mobile wallet and other apps use but want to limit my spending to prepaid plans instead of post paid so I don't get a surprise bill of $1000 at the end of the month from my phone provider. Thank you for your time,
submitted by losgalapagos to AndroidQuestions [link] [comments]

How To Open a Bitcoin Wallet How to make BITCOIN WALLET and EARN FREE BITCOINS  Android Running Mycelium Bitcoin wallet Android app on the desktop with ARCwelder How To Claim BitCoin Cash Sell For Bitcoins Mycelium Electron Cash How to backup and restore a Bitcoin mobile wallet

Download Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet for PC free at BrowserCam. Learn to download and Install Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet on PC (Windows) which is actually built by Mycelium Developers. containing wonderful features. There exist's few useful points listed below that you will need to pay attention to just before you start to download Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet PC.</p> Bitcoin payment processor: everyone can accept BTC payments online privately and securely with initial setup lasting mere minutes. VISIT WEBSITE. CARD. NETWORK. The most ambitious of Mycelium technologies, the Card network replaces heavily infrastructure dependent global payment networks with a light weight smart card & hub system which needs only a basic internet connection. With scale, Card ... Mycelium ist die „bekannteste“ Bitcoin-Wallet-App für Android. Sie ist sehr benutzerfreundlich, wenn es um das Erhalten und Senden von Zahlungen geht und das Backup ist recht einfach. Der große Bonus: man kann sich persönlich zum Kauf und Verkauf von Bitcoins treffen. Dafür tritt man einfach über die App in Kontakt und bespricht alle Details. breadwallet. breadwallet, anfangs nur für ... The Default Bitcoin Wallet. TESTED BY HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF USERS FOR MANY YEARS. No ALTERNATIVE HAS MORE STARS ON GOOGLE PLAY. Expect A Massive Upgrade. Mycelium Wallet is great for bitcoiners. We will make it useful for everybody. Not Leaving Mankind Overboard. Bitcoiners know: no matter how hard banks try, a good wallet is still better than any e-banking app. We feel we should invite the ... Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet on PC: Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet is a Free App, developed by the Mycelium Developers for Android devices, but it can be used on PC or Laptops as well.We will look into the process of How to Download and install Mycelium Bitcoin Wallet on PC running Windows 7, 8, 10 or Mac OS X.

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How To Open a Bitcoin Wallet

How to setup a Bitcoin Cash wallet using the Bitcoin.com wallet app for Apple, Iphone, Windows, Linux and Android. Wallet https://www.bitcoin.com/choose-your... ️ ️ ️ https://goo.gl/x4miiu Top 3 Best Bitcoin And Cryptocurrency Wallets To Use If you want to know which Bitcoin or cryptocurrency wallet to use, you landed on the right video! I will ... Hello eVeryone! In this video im gonna show you how to make a New Bitcoin wallet and also how to earn FREE Bitcoins Daily from your Android devices!! Links to Download;- Zebpay wallet- https ... 💰 My #1 Recommendation To Make Money Online - Click Here Now ️ http://LifeWithoutLimits.co 💰 CryptoTab Browser (THE BEST!) ️ https://get.cryptobrowser.site/... There are also downloads for Linux and Apple OS. ... How to Setup Mycelium Bitcoin Android Wallet To Store Bitcoins - Duration: 18:15. CoinSutra - Simplifying Bitcoin & Cryptocurrency 39,378 views ...

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